Post headline: "We are failing our children"

SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2021

Colbert King continues to speak: Colbert King is 81, going on 82.

He grew up in Washington, D.C. He graduated from (Paul Laurence) Dunbar High, then moved on to Howard.

He has lived the bulk of his life in D.C. He joined the Washington Post's editorial board in 1990, then became the editorial page's deputy editor in 2000.

In 2003, he won the Pulitzer Prize in commentary "for his against-the-grain columns that speak to people in power with ferocity and wisdom."

(In our view, he made a terrible journalistic misjudgment during the 2000 campaign, but people do make mistakes and he might believe that we're wrong.)

King is the extremely rare, high-end commentator who focuses on urban youth. When he does, he tends to keep it local.

This morning, the headline on his column makes such a reference. Hard-copy headline included, his column starts like this:

KING (7/17/21): We are failing our children

Did you think for one second that the highly publicized March 23 carjacking of Uber Eats delivery driver Mohammad Anwar in Southeast D.C., which resulted in a horrific crash that left Anwar dead and two girls, age 13 and 15, under arrest, would cause a pause in carjackings and other offenses by juveniles? What planet are you on?

For the record, that fatal carjacking was heavily publicized in D.C. and pretty much nowhere else. It was executed by girls who were only 13 and 15—and as King notes, the trend didn't start or end there.

"Let’s return to grim reality," he says. Then he starts calling the roll:

KING: On March 12 and 16, less than two weeks before Anwar’s death, boys ages 15 and 14 were arrested and charged in the Feb. 27 armed carjacking of a ride-share driver in the 1400 block of Shippen Lane SE.

On March 25, two days after Anwar died, 13- and 14-year-old boys were arrested in an armed carjacking in the 100 block of 42nd Street NE.

On April 29 in the 300 Block of H Street NE, a driver was confronted by knife-wielding carjackers who took his vehicle and fled. A 15-year-old was arrested July 12 and charged with armed carjacking.

[...]

On July 8, a 15- and a 16-year-old boy and a 14-year-old girl were charged in an armed carjacking in the 1800 block of Central Place NE.

The next day, in the 1200 block of New Jersey Avenue SE, a driver was assaulted with a stun gun in an attempted carjacking. The suspects were unsuccessful in getting the car, so they fled on foot. Police officers arrested three girls, ages 16, 14 and 12, and charged them with armed carjacking. Police said they were seeking a fourth suspect as well.

Let that sink in: a 12-year-old girl.

We're only including cases with kids who are younger than 16. As King continues, he reports that police have shut down "an apparent teenage robbery spree" in which five teens—one of them only 13—"allegedly committed at least 19 crimes in D.C., including armed robbery, assault and unauthorized use of a vehicle, between July 3 and July 14."

In his column, King questions whether the D.C. government is doing enough to address the needs of the kids who end up committing such crimes. 

We can't speak to that question. But whenever we read about incidents like these, we always wonder how these kids reached the point of committing such horrific crimes—often, such horrific armed crimes—when they were so young.

What could have been happening in their lives? In many of these cases, their lives have largely been forfeited too.

How do kids who are so young end up committing such crimes? Except in columns by Colbert King, such questions are no longer popular or au courant, at least not here in Our Town.

In Our Town, our thought leaders rarely grew up in urban neighborhoods. When they perform their high morality regarding the lives of urban kids, they may tend to create the kinds of reports which appeared, for perhaps the ten millionth time, on the front page of yesterday's New York Times.

The report appeared on the Times' front page. Online, the headlines say this:

Boston Overhauls Admissions to Exclusive Exam Schools
A new policy will increase representation of Black and Latino students in the prestigious public schools, which serve as a gateway to elite colleges.

The report appeared on the front page. There the Times went again! 

The Times is concerned with the sliver of kids who may end up at Harvard or Yale. It very much tends to avert its gaze from the kids who, for whatever reasons, may end up committing armed robberies or violent carjackings when they're just 12 or 14.

Except for Colbert King, no one seems to wonder or care about those kids. We've noted this fairly obvious fact again and again and again.

Is it news that Boston is changing admission procedures to its venerable old Boston Latin High School? Within reason, yes it is.

That said, the front-page report in yesterday's Times was maddening for two different reasons. 

First, it was maddening because, once again, it front-paged those kids who may get into our "elite colleges," possibly after attending our "prestigious public schools." As seems to be policy at the Times, the report cares about those urban kids, and about no one else. 

The report was maddening on that basis—on the basis of values. It was also maddening on the basis of simple logic, for the same old reason:

Even as it plumps and preens in support of the (perfectly valid) goal of getting more black and Hispanic kids into schools like Boston Latin, it never asks the obvious question:

If that many kids can succeed at a school like Boston Latin, why not double the number of seats at the "exclusive, prestigious" school? Why leave the number of seats unchanged, then start looking for ways to kick other kids out?

Simply put, the New York Times is too limited to raise that obvious question. The Times writes on this theme again and again, and this blindingly obvious question never enters its head.

Nor will the Times report or discuss the "achievement gaps" which help define one of the problems we all continue to live with. Only recently did we realize why this silence is (possibly) being maintained:

Professor Kendi has said that even discussing the gaps is a racist act. On that basis, the frustrations and struggles of many kids are turned into dust in the wind as those kids get kicked to the curb.

In our nine years in the Baltimore City Schools, we taught no one but Baltimore City kids. We especially recall those lovely kids on three separate occasions:

We recall the outrage of our first fifth-grade class in the spring on 1970 when we watched the Steinbeck film, The Forgotten Village. The film describes how people react when an epidemic assails a rural, pre-modern Mexican village.

 How could parents possibly let their children die? these lovely kids angrily asked.

(We especially remember NAME WITHHELD angrily raising that question.)

We recall the question fifth-graders asked, several years later, in reaction to what they had seen on the gigantic TV show, Roots. 

How could anyone ever have been willing to hold other people as "slaves?" That's the question those very good kids asked, and they spoke in genuine puzzlement.

We also remember the way kids sat, enthralled, as Mrs. Young read Eleanor Estes' superlative book, The Hundred Dresses, to their fifth-grade class. The book describes a girl whose parents are Polish immigrants being teased by some of her classmates in a town near Pittsburgh.

Those Baltimore kids hung on every word. (We can still see the late NAME WITHHELD leaning forward in his seat.) The world  will score them as "black" kids, but they deeply cared about the unfairness being fictionally dished to that "white" Pittsburgh kid in Eleanor Estes' great book.

In our nine years, we taught only two kids who seemed to be some version of truly disturbed. One was fatally stabbed at age 38. A 19-year-old was arrested. We don't know what happened.

Moving ahead to the present day, what explains why a 13-year-old girl would take part in a violent carjacking? It can sometimes seem that the New York Times is too fine to wonder or ask. 

The famous newspaper is all wrapped up in the small number of kids who might end up at Yale. At present, it seems that these are the values, horizons and ways of our own deeply self-impressed Town.

Colbert King's assessment: King's column ends as shown:

KING: What is unknown is whether the city is offering more than rhetoric and made-up “sounds and feels good” services. What these youths, who have baggage that many adults have never carried, need is the steadfast attention of committed professionals with extensive therapeutic experience, along with supportive families—and a clerical community that seems to have lost its voice—to help them turn their young lives toward a different path.

Short of that, D.C., build more jails, and look both ways before driving.

These youths "have baggage that many adults have never carried," King says. 

Presumably, that's correct. Also, there but for fortune! (Try not to use the world "privilege.")

We would stress the idea that interventions should happen before kids commit terrible crimes. That said, King says those kids need "the steadfast attention of committed professionals...along with supportive families."

In many cases, we'll guess that the problem may begin with the lack of a supportive structure at home, or with something much worse. As for the clerical community, there are a lot of "communities" in Our Town which no longer seem inclined to talk about the lives, interests and experiences of deeply struggling kids.

According to the Times, these kids should all be sent to Boston Latin, and from there on to Yale. (Other kids will have to get booted.) These seem to be the moral and intellectual horizons which now obtain in Our Town.

One last point:

This point concerns the people to whom it doesn't occur that Boston Latin should maybe add seats. Are these the same people who read the Einstein-made-easy books, then stand in line to tell the world that they understood every word?

Imperfection is rampant in other towns. How about over here, in our own?  


30 comments:

  1. "Imperfection is rampant in other towns. How about over here, in our own? "

    Oh yes, dear Bob. We certainly much prefer the alleged imperfections of 'their' towns to the sanctity of your shithole cities.

    ReplyDelete
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  2. "In his column, King questions whether the D.C. government is doing enough to address the needs of the kids who end up committing such crimes.

    We can't speak to that question. "

    Somerby remains agnostic on the whole point of King's column. In today's highly performative exercise in caring, Somerby cannot be bothered to form any opinion on solutions to child crime. He prefers to beat his breast about the fact that children who are too young to drive and too poor to own cars are hijacking Uber drivers. He is utterly unwilling to think at all about what to do about it.

    His only purpose seems to be to show that he cares deeply, deeply I say, about "urban" children committing crimes. Whatta guy!

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  3. "In Our Town, our thought leaders rarely grew up in urban neighborhoods. "

    Neither did Somerby.

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  4. "The Times is concerned with the sliver of kids who may end up at Harvard or Yale."

    Somerby thinks it should be concerned with the sliver of kids who hijack Uber drivers. As if it cannot report on both, as news arises.

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  5. "Except for Colbert King, no one seems to wonder or care about those kids. We've noted this fairly obvious fact again and again and again."

    I would imagine that Uber drivers care. And the folks who work for family and social services, and those in the juvenile justice system, and some percentage of the parents of the kids involved (despite their children's wayward behavior -- children are sometimes out of control despite their parents' efforts, not because of them), and some percentage of teachers and community residents no doubt care. This may be starting to add up to more people than Somerby wises to acknowledge, caring but not having the resources or ideas to cope with such child behavior. And neither does Somerby, since he doesn't deal in solutions, just recriminations.

    But Somerby's target isn't those people who DO care. It is white liberals (like himself?) and the media, whose job is to cover all types of news, not just kids committing crimes (which they are obviously covering or Somerby couldn't have collected a list of crimes so conveniently). Somehow those media reporters have failed to singlehandedly solve this problem, or express sufficient angst about it, to reassure Somerby that they are on the job when it comes to teen car hijackings. How could they have been so remiss?

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  6. "Professor Kendi has said that even discussing the gaps is a racist act. On that basis, the frustrations and struggles of many kids are turned into dust in the wind as those kids get kicked to the curb."

    Somerby is missing the point that such tests are not an accurate measure of the potential of black kids. Somerby assumes that these kids are incapable of succeeding in life because of such test scores. That is an incorrect assumption.

    Elite colleges are abandoning such tests for admission screening, not to make it easier for minority kids to be admitted, but because those tests are not good predictors of later performance in their schools, as evidenced by college grades and other measures of success. The tests screen out capable students who could succeed given the chance. That makes them inherently unfair and it makes continued use of such tests a form of systemic racism. Somerby has never discussed this FACT (it is a fact and not an opinion because the correlations are data that speak for themselves).

    This is also true for the NAEP and other testing in lower grades. So those kids whose scores produce a gap may be reading better in their classes than their test scores might suggest, able to function in other school tasks, earning higher grades than NAEP scores reflect. That is the reason for giving them a chance to participate in these magnet schools and special educational opportunities, instead of using standardized tests to screen them out. And that screening out of black students who could benefit from such opportunities is also racist.

    Somerby thinks the solution is to double the schools, not include the capable black and Latino students. That is a kind of "separate but equal" solution. It isn't attempted because of the high cost of staff and resources in such schools. It would mean increasing budgets and that may not be feasible, politically or financially.

    By juxtaposing this story about elite schools with stories about urban kids hijacking cars, Somerby implies that they are connected. They are not. There would not be fewer hijackings in D.C. if Boston were to double seats in its magnet schools. But Somerby doesn't want to deal with causes or solutions to hijackings, any more than he wants to delve into how standardized tests work or what they are for.

    It is unclear what he expects hapless reporters to do about our society's problems. He thinks reporting on them is a sign that no one cares, but that logic seems "muddled" to me. Somerby could perform a useful service here by focusing himself on education issues. He never does that. I often wonder why not. Today he seems intent on convincing us that not only are black kids carjackers, but their NAEP scores are too low to justify participation in elite classes, and that is because they are black, urban, and no one cares sbout them. Aside from being untrue, what does Somerby think should be done? Crickets from Somerby about that.

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  7. "We would stress the idea that interventions should happen before kids commit terrible crimes."

    Here are some solutions that Somerby never manages to discuss:

    https://strongnation.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/638/21c3574b-494c-495b-9249-ede8f939d40a.pdf?1555512439&inline;%20filename=%22Law%20Enforcement%20Agrees:%20High-Quality%20Pre-K%20is%20Crime%20Prevention.pdf%22

    https://www.opportunityinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/early-learning/ELCLinkCrimeReduction-Jul02.pdf

    https://www.vox.com/2014/7/30/5952739/the-research-on-how-pre-k-could-reduce-crime

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6344026/

    Note that reports about this finding have been all over the media. One wonders why Somerby didn't draw this connection between prevention of child crime and early childhood education. Is he unaware of it? Does he not want to argue for something that would benefit those child carjackers?

    His failure to mention this and the media exposure it has recently received convinces me that Somerby's pose of caring deeply what happens to black children is just an empty stance, performative to the core, superficial, an excuse to attack the media and liberals on social issues (a liberal strength) in support of conservative goals. If he can portray liberals as hypocrites, he can perhaps weaken support for Democratic initiatives and candidates and bolster the party of Trump, Gaetz, Boebert and Cawthorn. Whatta guy our Somerby is! Cue Cecelia to tell us how brilliant and wonderful he is...

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  8. Somerby has singled out the children who are below age 16 in today's essay, but aren't those exactly the ones who would be most likely to hijack an uber? Older kids might have more access to cars (or friends and family with cars) and would be eligible for driver's licenses, so they might be less likely to attempt such crimes. They might also have more judgment.

    Somerby also fails to discuss whether this is a recent phenomenon, perhaps a reaction to covid restrictions on public transit. It would have been helpful to know how long this has been going on.

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  9. ‘The Times is concerned with the sliver of kids who may end up at Harvard or Yale. It very much tends to avert its gaze from the kids who, for whatever reasons, may end up committing armed robberies or violent carjackings when they're just 12 or 14.’

    A cursory search reveals the following that appeared recently in the Times:

    A Novel Effort to See How Poverty Affects Young Brains
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/07/upshot/stimulus-children-poverty-brain.html

    Disadvantaged Students More Likely to Be Learning Remotely, Study Finds
    Research from Columbia University suggests that less effective instruction will widen the achievement gap.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/24/us/remote-learning-student-income.html

    Rich Schools, Poor Schools and a Biden Plan
    The way U.S. education is funded can widen disparities. A proposed $20 billion program seeks to even things out.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/09/upshot/biden-school-funding.html

    Is Education No Longer the ‘Great Equalizer’?
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/23/opinion/education-poverty-intervention.html

    Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Is Growing Wider
    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/23/business/economy/education-gap-between-rich-and-poor-is-growing-wider.html

    How to Break the Poverty Cycle
    How much good does a preschool experience offer children born in poverty? Enough to make their later lives much better, and they pass a heritage of opportunity on to their own children.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/27/opinion/how-to-break-the-poverty-cycle.html

    There are more, but you get the idea. No one can force Somerby to acknowledge these kinds of articles and carry on a more balanced discussion of whether the New York Times ‘cares’ about this, not to mention the sweeping assertion that the purported lack of concern at the Times supposedly indicates a general lack of concern in Liberal Town.

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  10. Somerby presents this somewhat hysterically as 12 & 14 year olds carrying guns and kidnapping and carjacking Uber drivers. They are most likely hanging around with the older kids (15 & 16 and older) who are instigating the crimes and perhaps holding the weapons. Somerby is somewhat excitedly pretending that these very young children are committing terribles crimes.

    If you look at this more rationally, it seems these kids may instead be using guns for intimidation (not shooting) and may be stealing uber rides. At worst, this is a modern day version of joy-riding, a tradition among urban and rural youth. Or you might think of it as turnstyle hopping, since they are stealing rides. I doubt there is any intention to engage in anything more serious than going from place to place during a time when rapid transit has been dysfunctional.

    Somerby is looking at these crimes from an adult, law enforcement perspective, not from a kid perspective, and he is disregarding intent. It doesn't seem helpful to take such a view, but his real purpose here is to amp up the severity of the crimes in order to generate greater outrage and perhaps fear of inner city kids. If such kids are made to seem like monsters then the liberal neglect of the problem will seem more heinous. And this is how propaganda works. Bravo Somerby!

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  11. If Somerby were truly interested in civil rights and the needs of black children, he might have written about Gloria Richardson, a Maryland activist who died on July 16.

    Eric Loomis (Lawyers, Guns & Money blog) writes:

    "Gloria Richardson was not that well known anymore. But her role in the civil rights movement was transformative. In the early 1960s, she was the leader of the civil rights movement on Maryland’s eastern shore, based in the town of Cambridge. She was a true militant, someone who did not exactly reject King’s ideas of nonviolence, but one who kept them at arm’s length, embracing a black nationalism that could include armed self-defense. She openly called herself a revolutionary. She alienated the male dominated ministers side of the civil rights movement who did not trust her militancy and did not trust a woman as a leader. Seriously, these guys, from King on down, were super duper sexist. She was no youngster either. She was 40 years old as she led this and originated in the town’s Black middle class. She said that if John F. Kennedy didn’t visit Cambridge in 1963, there would be “civil war” between the races and her civil war was most definitely an armed struggle. She was supposed to talk at the March on Washington, but was basically shoved out the way by one of the SCLC officials right as she began her speech. When a compromise worked out by Bobby Kennedy called for a vote on desegregation, she rejected it and told her followers to not vote because rights should not be decided by a plebiscite, a point about which she was absolutely correct.

    Eventually, Richardson married a photographer and moved to New York, where she took on a more subdued role as an anti-poverty work. She was super burned out after three years of hell and she was not only major figure of the 1960s who disappeared from the public eye in the aftermath. Take Bob Moses, who was the almost Christ-like head of SNCC’s voting campaign in Mississippi and then was so burned out he fled to Africa for a few years before becoming a math teacher in Boston for the rest of his career.

    Gloria Richardson was a legend in the Black freedom struggle. That we don’t know more about her–just like we don’t know very much as a public about any of the women involved in the struggle outside of Rosa Parks and Angela Davis (and only maybe on Davis for most people) is a sign of just how limited our education about the movement remains."

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  12. This is what media criticism looks like:

    https://nomoremister.blogspot.com/2021/07/how-not-to-profile-tucker-carlson.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. This is media criticism too:

    "What right-wingers really believe isn't hard to find, but most reporters don't look. The mainstream press is particularly bad. There are a few mainstream reporters who specialize in QAnon and conspiratorialism, and who spend their days in the corners of the Internet where those matters are discussed. Media Matters tracks right-wing radio and cable news, as do a few other journalists. But the average mainstream reporter doesn't even know what's being discussed day to day at Gateway Pundit and Breitbart and the Epoch Times, or on the Rush Limbaugh-wannabe radio shows that still dominate the airwaves in much of America. So not only are manstream journalists surprised when an issue or scandal (or fake scandal) bubbles up from the right seemingly out of nowhere, or when an extreme belief manifests itself, they continue to assume that the well-behaved, sober-sounding members of Congress who appear on Sunday morning talk shows are representative of the Republican Party and conservatism.

    I'm just a part-time amateur blogger. I'm working in a medium that hasn't been relevant for more than a decade. But I've known from the beginning that the core of conservatism could be found at Free Republic, not at National Review."

    https://nomoremister.blogspot.com/2021/07/every-day-in-plain-sight-they-show-us.html

    Somerby shows us who he is too, every day, when he ignores acual media criticism in favor of the pretend critiques he publishes here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, okay. But on the other side, we find that those "mainstream reporters" dembots, as well as dembots of the halls of power, are practically indistinguishable from resident brain-dead zombie dembots here and in other "corners of the Internet".

      Delete
    2. That article is true and very important. Thanks.

      Delete
    3. There isn’t that much difference between Somerby’s regular musings and the No More Mister blogger insofar as they both appeal to liberals in the media to try to better understand the inhabitants of the basement of Republican thought. Well, somebody has to, I guess, so why not them, as long as it’s not me. How about conservatives in the media giving it a go? You could say David Brooks has given it a shot. A few years back a couple of writers for none other than the National Review wrote a piece about the disenfranchised white male, purporting to understand that slice of what would later become Trump voters, and what did they conclude? That the largely rural, low wage Caucasian males were afflicted with a lack of character that left them shiftless and susceptible to the opioid epidemic. As if they had become Negroes, for God’s sake. Such was an acceptable view as per the editors of that fiercely conservative publication, and George Will would likely have approved. Since then, George and a large swath of Republican intelligentsia left the building with Trump’s name on it. Finally, a few years back a study out of the Princeton poly sci department came to the conclusion that post election it is much more likely that the winner’s voters will bend to the will of their elected leader than vice versa. The result would have it that Trump defines his followers more so than they define him. Seems about right.

      Delete
  14. The question that few people are asking is, "Where are the parent(s)? These kids do not commit crimes because of systemic racism, they commit crimes because their parents have shirked their duty. In most cases because they should never be parents in the first place. And no, don't tell me that they couldn't help it.

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    Replies
    1. Parents shirking their duty...like the ones working two jobs to make ends meet?

      I read a study once that said that parents who drink more have kids who act out more in school. You would think that the parental drinking would be causing the acting out among the children, but when they looked closer, the causality went the other direction. The kids who were more poorly behaved caused their parents to drink more.

      If you've never been a parent and never encountered a difficult child, it is tempting to think that parents cause all of the their kids' problems, but some kids are harder to raise than others, and some are very difficult. So it is better not to be so judgmental when you encounter a family where the kids are in trouble.

      And yes, systematic racism makes everything more difficult for everyone. Systemic racism means that instead of receiving resources to help with problems, kids become the focus of policing, for example.

      Delete
  15. As a country were not interested in investing in the things that help people. It's much more fun to just profit from the after-effects of the excesses of needless competition, degradation, and exploitation. It's the American way!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Here in Baltimore the Mayor is trying to create a social service, educational, and public health infrastructure centered around a concept called, “Trauma Informed Care.” The idea is based on a point of view that acknowledges that the lives of citizens in our communities have been shaped by violence, disinvestment, environmental hazards, food insecurity, that have created something akin to city wide PTSD. And we need to structure responses that center those issues, rather than looking to a singular law enforcement response to our challenges.
    I’m looking forward to rebuilding the city on that care ensemble vs what we’ve been doing for the last 50 years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds like a good plan. Thanks for the info.

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    2. Right: government is your friend. Thanks for the laughs, dear dembot.

      They will help Soros&Co. ship your job abroad, and give you a miracle blue pill, to stay content.

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    4. You know Mao, the government isn’t my bestie, but given that some of the electeds in my municipality are trying to rethink how to pull an aging rust belt city out of a 50 year doom spiral, I’m going to give them the opportunity to try.
      Along with them are countless citizens working on small bore projects to help people ground down by decades of neoliberalism and supply side macro policy.
      Here’s a great example: two former NFL players have moved back to the city they grew up in and they’re running a Summer school for kids in one of our impoverished neighborhoods. Did they get a grant from OSF to run this program? Not sure. What I do know is they’re helping a couple of dozen kids catch up on learning loss after a year of Zoom school. One of the gentlemen spent a couple of years in the city’s K-12 system, and after running into a challenging bureaucracy, decided to find an old school, pull together grants, renovate the space, enlist another caring wide out work with a group of youngsters who might have fallen through the cracks.
      Maybe the people at BCPS will notice this pilot and scale it up next Summer.
      You’ve got to try.
      Sure, you can bitch in Bob’s comments or you can make those kids lives better.

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    Hello all my viewers, I am very happy for sharing this great testimonies,The best thing that has ever happened in my life is how I win the lottery euro million mega jackpot. I am a Woman who believe that one day I will win the lottery. finally my dreams came through when I email believelovespelltemple@gmail.com and tell him I need the lottery numbers. I have spend so much money on ticket just to make sure I win. But I never know that winning was so easy until the day I meant the spell caster online which so many people has talked about that he is very great in casting lottery spell, . so I decide to give it a try.I contacted this great Dr Believe and he did a spell and he gave me the winning lottery numbers. But believe me when the draws were out I was among winners. I win 30,000 million Dollar. Dr Believe truly you are the best, all thanks to you forever

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  21. Hello to everyone out here, I am here to share the unexpected miracle that happened to me … My name is Susan Christian , I live in London, UK. we got married for more than 9 years and have gotten two kids. thing were going well with us and we are always happy. until one day my husband started to behave in a way i could not understand, i was very confused by the way he treat me and the kids. later that month he did not come home again and he called me that he want a divorce, i asked him what have i done wrong to deserve this from him, all he was saying is that he want a divorce that he hate me and do not want to see me again in his life, i was mad and also frustrated do not know what to do, i was sick for more than 2 weeks because of the divorce. i love him so much he was everything to me without him my life is incomplete. i told my sister and she told me to contact a spell caster, i never believe in all this spell casting of a thing. i just want to try if something will come out of it. i contacted Dr Emu for the return of my husband to me, they told me that my husband have been taken by another woman, that she cast a spell on him that is why he hate me and also want us to divorce. then they told me that they have to cast a spell on him that will make him return to me and the kids, they casted the spell and after 24 hours my husband called me and he told me that i should forgive him, he started to apologize on phone and said that he still love me that he did not know what happen to him that he left me. it was the spell that Dr Emu casted on him that make him come back to me today, me and my family are now happy again today. thank you Dr Emu for what you have done for me i would have been nothing today if not for your great spell. i want you my friends who are passing through all this kind of love problem of getting back their husband, wife , or ex boyfriend and girlfriend to contact Dr Emu , if you need his help you can contact him through his private mail: emutemple@gmail.com or you can contact him through his website https://emutemple.wordpress.com/ fb page Https://web.facebook.com/Emu-Temple-104891335203341 and you will see that your problem will be solved without any delay.

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