A SIMPLE CONCEPT: There's "no better description of relativity!"

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28, 2021

What Galileo said:  As we noted last week, several parts of Einstein's universe are easy to describe. In that sense, and to that extent, those parts of Einstein's universe are easy to understand.

As we noted last week, Walter Isaacson describes one such part of Einstein's universe at the end of Chapter Six in his 2007 biography, Einstein: His Life and Universe. Below, we show you that passage again:

The result was an elegant conclusion: mass and energy are different manifestations of the same thing. There is a fundamental interchangeability between the two. As he put it in his paper, "The mass of a body is a measure of its energy content."

The formula he used to describe this relationship was also strikingly simple...

E = mc2.

Energy equals mass times the square of light. The speed of light, of course, is huge. Squared it is almost inconceivably bigger. That is why a tiny amount of matter, if converted into energy, has an enormous punch. A kilogram of mass would convert into approximately 25 billion kilowatt hours of electricity. More vividly: the energy in the mass of one raisin could supply most of New York City's energy needs for a day.

It's easy to understand what's being said in that passage. Tiny amounts of matter can be converted into enormous amounts of energy. 

The raisin which could fuel New York makes this presentation memorable. It may be hard to understand how any such thing could actually happen. But it's easy to understand what is being said.

That easy-to-understand presentation comes at the very end of Isaacson's Chapter Six. Once again, this is his full chapter title:

CHAPTER SIX Special Relativity, 1905

According to Isaacson, the raisin which could fuel New York emerges from Einstein's special theory of relativity. Chapter Six is devoted to that theory. It ends with a presentation which is easy to understand.

As we noted yesterday, the chapter doesn't start that way; in our view, it starts in a highly murky fashion. Today, we'll see the lack of clarity grow—or at least, so it says here—as Isaacson's presentation continues.

Yesterday, we looked at the first six paragraphs in Isaacson's Chapter Six. The chapter opens with a counterintuitive claim—"Relativity is a simple concept"—then wanders forward from there.

The first six paragraphs of the chapter form a fairly obvious unit. We've struggled to make clear sense of that unit ever since we first encountered Isaacson's book thirteen years ago. 

As noted yesterday, Isaacson starts Chapter Six by saying what relativity "asserts." (At this point, he's speaking about the general concept of relativity, not about Einstein's "special theory.")

"Relativity asserts that the fundamental laws of physics are the same whatever your state of motion," Isaacson says in his opening paragraph. But he fails to explain why anyone should be surprised, or should feel informed in some way, by any such assertion. 

From there, he meanders through a set of somewhat fuzzy claims concerning a rapidly-changing set of topics whose interconnections are poorly explained. Thirteen years into our search, we still can't master this wandering presentation.

At the end of this opening unit, Isaacson signals that he is moving ahead to a new point of focus. As we noted yesterday, the transition from paragraphs 5 and 6 to paragraph 7 reads like this:

The special theory of relativity that Einstein developed in 1905 applies only to this special case (hence the name): a situation in which the observers are moving at a constant velocity relative to one another—uniformly in a straight line at a steady speed—referred to as an “inertial reference system.”

It’s harder to make the more general case that a person who is accelerating or turning or rotating or slamming on the brakes or moving in an arbitrary manner is not in some form of absolute motion, because coffee sloshes and balls roll away in a different manner than for people on a smoothly gliding train, plane, or planet. It would take Einstein a decade more, as we shall see, to come up with what he called a general theory of relativity, which incorporated accelerated motion into a theory of gravity and attempted to apply the concept of relativity to it.

The story of relativity best begins in 1632, when Galileo articulated the principle that the laws of motion and mechanics  (the laws of electromagnetism had not yet been discovered) were the same in all constant-velocity reference frames. ...

There you see paragraphs 5 and 6, plus the first sentence in paragraph 7. At this point, we'll be moving back to the year 1632, when "the story of relativity" can best be said to have gotten its start.

We're moving back to something Galileo said in 1632. In our view, the initial murkiness of this chapter only continues as Isaacson explores this early part of "the story of relativity."

AT THIS POINT IN HIS PRESENTATION, Isaacson transitions to a question Galileo addressed in 1632. Copernicus had advanced a revolutionary idea—the idea that the earth doesn't rest motionless at the center of the universe, with everything else revolving around it. 

Traditionalists made the following claim: if the earth was moving, as Copernicus said, we would be able to feel it. In his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Galileo offered an argument in support of Copernicus’s view.

By modern reckoning, of course, Galileo was right and the traditionalists were wrong. By modern reckoning, the earth is moving at a very high speed around the sun, as are the other planets in the solar system.

As he discusses this historical episode, Isaacson gives a perfectly coherent account of Galileo's response to the traditionalists in support of Copernicus. And sure enough:

 As Isaacson proceeds, it's fairly easy to understand what Galileo is said to have said. 

This new discussion makes fairly clear sense—but does it help the general reader understand what has gone before it in Chapter Six? We would be inclined to say no, but this is the way Isaacson starts this new discussion:

The story of relativity best begins in 1632, when Galileo articulated the principle that the laws of motion and mechanics (the laws of electromagnetism had not yet been discovered) were the same in all constant-velocity reference frames. In his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Galileo wanted to defend Copernicus’s idea that the earth does not rest motionless at the center of the universe with everything else revolving around it. Skeptics contended that if the earth was moving, as Copernicus said, we’d feel it. Galileo refuted this with a brilliantly clear thought experiment about being inside the cabin of a smoothly sailing ship:

If the earth was really moving, we would be able to feel it! According to Isaacson, Galileo refuted this claim with a thought experiment about a smoothly sailing ship.

At this point, we offer a warning. The first part of that paragraph may be challenging for general readers. The notion that the laws of motion and mechanics "are the same in all constant-velocity reference frames" may be about as clear as Venetian mud for such non-specialist readers.

(Possibly adding to the problem: As we noted yesterday, the use of such technical language shifts about in various ways in this chapter's opening pages.)

That said, Isaacson's treatment of Galileo's thought experiment seems fairly easy to follow. Below, you see the way Chapter Six proceeds through paragraphs 8 and 9, with Galileo quoted at length:

The story of relativity best begins in 1632, when Galileo articulated the principle that the laws of motion and mechanics (the laws of electromagnetism had not yet been discovered) were the same in all constant-velocity reference frames. In his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Galileo wanted to defend Copernicus’s idea that the earth does not rest motionless at the center of the universe with everything else revolving around it. Skeptics contended that if the earth was moving, as Copernicus said, we’d feel it. Galileo refuted this with a brilliantly clear thought experiment about being inside the cabin of a smoothly sailing ship:

"Shut yourself up with some friend in the main cabin below decks on some large ship, and have with you there some flies, butterflies, and other small flying animals. Have a large bowl of water with some fish in it; hang up a bottle that empties drop by drop into a wide vessel beneath it. With the ship standing still, observe carefully how the little animals fly with equal speed to all sides of the cabin. The fish swim indifferently in all directions; the drops fall into the vessel beneath; and, in throwing something to your friend, you need throw it no more strongly in one direction than another, the distances being equal; jumping with your feet together, you pass equal spaces in every direction. When you have observed all these things carefully, have the ship proceed with any speed you like, so long as the motion is uniform and not fluctuating this way and that. You will discover not the least change in all the effects named, nor could you tell from any of them whether the ship was moving or standing still."

There is no better description of relativity, or at least of how that principle applies to systems that are moving at a constant velocity relative to each other.

That's the full text of paragraphs 7-9. Question:

Back in 1632, would that presentation by Galileo have convinced the skeptics that their argument was flawed? Maybe yes and maybe no. But we'll guess that today's general reader would find it reasonably easy to follow the presentation, in which Galileo was apparently saying this:

You can be inside a moving ship without having any idea that the ship is moving. Similarly, you can be riding on a fast-moving planet without experiencing any effects of that motion.

So far, so understandable! But while this may help us understand what Galileo said to the skeptics, does it help us understand what "relativity" holds, asserts or maintains? Does it help us understand the "simple concept" described by Isaacson at the start of this chapter?

At this point, Isaacson proceeds to offer a set of full-length paragraphs fleshing out the physics behind Galileo's presentation. To give you a sense of where this goes, the next four grafs say this:

Inside Galileo’s ship, it is easy to have a conversation, because the air that carries the sound waves is moving smoothly along with the people in the chamber. Likewise, if one of Galileo’s passengers dropped a pebble into a bowl of water, the ripples would emanate the same way they would if the bowl were resting on shore; that’s because the water propagating the ripples is moving smoothly along with the bowl and everything else in the chamber.

Sound waves and water waves are easily explained by classical mechanics. They are simply a traveling disturbance in some medium. That is why sound cannot travel through a vacuum. But it can travel through such things as air or water or metal. For example, sound waves move through room temperature air, as a vibrating disturbance that compresses and rarefies the air, at about 770 miles per hour.

Deep inside Galileo’s ship, sound and water waves behave as they do on land, because the air in the chamber and the water in the bowls are moving at the same velocity as the passengers. But now imagine that you go up on deck and look at the waves out in the ocean, or that you measure the speed of the sound waves from the horn of another boat. The speed at which these waves come toward you depends on your motion relative to the medium (the water or air) propagating them.

In other words, the speed at which an ocean wave reaches you will depend on how fast you are moving through the water toward or away from the source of the wave. The speed of a sound wave relative to you will likewise depend on your motion relative to the air that’s propagating the sound wave.

The first three paragraphs help us understand the physics which prevails inside a smoothly moving ship. Presumably, the same principle obtains on our fast-moving planet, which carries its atmosphere along with it as it travels through space.

This is all well and good for those who want to understand this historical dispute. By now, though, we're on the fourth page of Chapter Six, and we still may lack a clear idea of the way this succession of ruminations is meant to illuminate the "simple concept" which appeared at the start of the chapter. 

Does this presentation about Galileo help the general reader explain the puzzling description of relativity which appears at the start of the chapter? We can't really see why it would.

Meanwhile, how about this statement by Isaacson: "There is no better description of relativity" than the quoted passage from Galileo.

Will the general reader be able to explain that ringing endorsement? You'd have to question the general reader, but we'll guess that he or she would have a hard time expounding on that statement.

In what way does Galileo's presentation qualify as a "description of relativity" which can't be surpassed? Indeed, in what way can it be described as a "description of relativity" at all?  We'll guess that many general readers will have a hard time with such basic questions.

Alas, this Chapter Six! The chapter starts with a somewhat peculiar statement concerning what relativity asserts. At this point, four pages in, to what extent would the general reader be able to speak to that basic topic in an intelligent way?

Has relativity emerged as "a simple concept" in the mind of the general reader? Again, consider the contrast with the presentation with which we began today:

The general reader will have no problem understanding the claim that a small amount of matter can be transformed into a huge amount of energy. Similarly, the general reader will probably have little trouble understanding Galileo's defense of Copernicus' revolutionary claim.

The statement about the production of energy is easy to understand. But at this point, can we expect the general reader to be able to explain what relativity has been said to assert? 

The general reader may be able to repeat or recite the words in that opening paragraph. ("Relativity asserts that the fundamental laws of physics are the same whatever your state of motion.") 

The general reader may be able to repeat those words. But how well will the general reader do if he or she is questioned about that somewhat puzzling statement? Even after the passage from Galileo, we'll guess that he or she wouldn't do especially well.

By the point we've reached today, the general reader is on the fourth page of Isaacson's Chapter Six. Isaacson is making a transition to yet another basic topic, to a discussion of the nature of light.

That next discussion may or may not seem to make sense to the general reader. But how well do these brief discussions of various topics form a coherent larger discussion? How well do these short, successive discussions illuminate some major point?

On a periodic basis, we've been reading Isaacson's book for the past thirteen years. We still can't make  clear sense of these opening pages of Chapter Six. We still can't answer those questions. 

Unlike the brief presentation about the raisin which fueled New York, this part of Isaacson's book has always seemed remarkably murky to us. After thirteen years of parsing his text, that impression hasn't changed.

Next week, we'll be moving to a part of Chapter Six which is taken straight out of Einstein's own book for general readers. At issue is an important part of Einstein's special theory of relativity, the subject of Chapter Six.

In Isaacson's words, the passage concerns the "eureka moment" in which Einstein "took one of the most elegant imaginative leaps in the history of physics." Isaacson's presentation concerning that leap comes right out of Einstein's 1916 text—the book whose lucidity was vouched for by Einstein's awestruck teen-aged niece.

On its face, the presentation in question has never seemed to make sense. Indeed, the passage doesn't seem to make sense in a remarkably straightforward way. More than a hundred years later, it seems that no one has noticed.

Next week, we'll look at that fascinating, straightforward part of Isaacson's Chapter Six. For now, we're still struggling with the meandering way the chapter begins as Isaacson attempts to explain what relativity asserts.

Is the general reader likely to understand the opening pages of Chapter Six? Despite the blurbs by major experts on the jacket of Isaacson's book, it seems to us that the answer is no. 

Tomorrow, we'll offer more thoughts on that possible state of affairs. The science was going to be hard, Isaacson says he was told.

Tomorrow (or Friday): What Brian Greene (and Charles Krauthammer) said


18 comments:

  1. "We've struggled to make clear sense of that unit ever since we first encountered Isaacson's book thirteen years ago. "

    No, Somerby has not "struggled" with that "unit". He has complained about it. But whining about having to make some effort isn't the same as doing the work.

    If Somerby had done anything whatsoever to try to understand Isaacson, he wouldn't still be at a loss after 13 years. People who engage in actual study learn things. People who complain and pass the blame to others do not learn anything.

    ReplyDelete
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  2. "Back in 1632, would that presentation by Galileo have convinced the skeptics that their argument was flawed? Maybe yes and maybe no. "

    How does one refute a person who answers his own question by saying maybe yes and maybe no? This is how Somerby rolls, rarely stating his own conclusion.

    Newton proposed similarly revolutionary ideas in the same time period, using empirical observations to overturn Greek natural philosophy that had been taught for centuries. Newton's ideas were so well accepted that Queen Anne knighted him for his discoveries. He revolutionized science. That statement means that he changed the minds of the majority of the scientists of his time and his laws replaced the previous consensus.

    But Somerby ignores evidence like this. He prefers to leave his questions open so that he can assert that anything is possible. Science doesn't work like that, thank God.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "Will the general reader be able to explain that ringing endorsement? You'd have to question the general reader, but we'll guess that he or she would have a hard time expounding on that statement."

    How many general readers would have to expound in order for Somerby to accept that Isaacson and Gallileo have done a reasonable job explaining the relativity of motion? Somerby never says. Presumably, if there were one other moron (along with himself) that would be enough for him to continue to assert that physics is hard and books shouldn't be written about it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. "the book whose lucidity was vouched for by Einstein's awestruck teen-aged niece."

    Yes, let's blame the women.

    Somerby wasn't there and he has no idea what Einstein's niece did or didn't say to Einstein about his book. She may even have understood it well, considering that Einstein's wife was a physics student and girls were permitted to study physics in that time period and brains, imagination and creativity, may have some slight genetic component. Why should we assume that she was stupid and overawed, instead of argumentative but not as stubborn as Einstein was about not changing parts of his book that he considered sufficiently clear? She may even have helped Einstein improve his wording, but not sufficiently to overcome Somerby's obtuseness. Somerby doesn't know.

    And whereas he is willing to allow for doubt when it comes to how many people understand Isaacson's paragraphs, he admits no doubt about the stupidity of Einstein's niece. She is dumb as rocks to Somerby and Somerby cannot conceive of a woman reading Einstein's work and finding it clear, because he himself cannot understand it. And he is secure in the belief that no woman can ever be smarter than himself, so it never enters his mind that perhaps Einstein's niece was right about the clarity of the book. Because that's how misogynists roll.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Everything is relative, dear Bob.

    Yes, everything -- except for the incredible, unimaginable talent of Hunter of Biden, Inc.

    Forget Einstein, dear Bob, forget that loser. Hunter of Biden, Inc.! His painting are so out of this world beautiful!

    Yay, yay, yay, dear Bob! Wow, wow, wow! OMG!

    ReplyDelete
  6. "Is the general reader likely to understand the opening pages of Chapter Six?"

    If someone wanted to understand relativity, would they read a biography about Einstein, or would they be more likely to read a text about the theory itself, perhaps one that introduced more physics concepts and used an entire book to lay a foundation for Einstein's work? A biography is about how a man came to do the things he did in his life. It is not about those things themselves, but about the person who did them. It would be misguided for someone to read Isaacson's biography of Einstein to understand his theory. The book is about the man, not his theories.

    Somerby, of course, knows nothing about history or psychology and thus cannot critique how well Isaacson has done in presenting the man. I find myself wondering whether Somerby would be able to grasp that biography of a scientist, having no background in science himself, lacking Einstein's creativity and imagination, and possessing an excessively literal approach to language and an inability to process metaphors. I think he would be as handicapped in that endeavor as he is in understanding relativity via metaphor.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It seems to me that when students waste time worrying about whether material is going to be easy or hard, they are wasting mental energy that is better devoted to digging into the material.

    A book is different than classroom learning because there is typically no one around to ask questions of, but that doesn't mean Somerby is limited to Isaacson's exposition. If there is no description of relativity that Somerby can understand, he really needs to consider whether this is his problem. Then, he has the choice of finding a tutor, giving up on it, or taking an online physics course (there are many available) so he can acquire the needed background.

    I doubt Somerby really cares about relativity or physics at all. His motives seem to be to make himself feel better about his lack of understanding by denigrating the authors (including Einstein and Hawking) and also to make himself feel better to questioning the whole idea that anyone has any expertise in anything -- others may ALL be frauds and cons. And why might he be so intent on doing that? Was the narcissistic insult of his college days so traumatic that he is still upset in his twilight years? It can happen. Look at Donald Trump. And a man who chooses to become a standup comedian is perhaps just as narcissistic. It seems clear that even teaching black 5th grade children two grade levels behind in their studies was insufficient to restore Somerby's sense of mental superiority.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What hinges on Somerby's understanding of a book about Einstein's theory? Nothing whatsoever. So why was this worth 13 years of "struggle"?

    If were reading a book that I did not understand, or one that I wasn't enjoying, I would abandon it and go on to another book -- there is always another book to read. I do not see why Somerby is so hung up on this. Hung up enough to want to assign blame to others. This is one of the weirdest phenomena I've encounted on the internet, a place where there are a lot of obsessed people.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Here is some real media criticism, unlike the nonsense that Somerby writes here:

    https://digbysblog.net/2021/07/for-the-sake-of-democracy-its-now-or-never/

    ReplyDelete
  10. Somerby has been relentless in his attacks on expertise, professors, authors and even school districts (with their concern for science magnet schools). Is this in support of the conservative focus on a less educated base? This article suggests that the conservative attack on knowledge is deliberate (from Colorado Newsline):

    "Twenty-five years ago Republicans were more educated than Democrats.

    Today, the inverse is true.

    The education gap is readily apparent. Facts have become partisan, and Republicans have tossed whole science books out the window. It’s a strategy that appears ill-considered at first glance — after all, what good is letting a virus ransack your base?

    But what if it’s not unintended, and Republicans are merely catering to a long-term dwindling literacy rate?

    GET THE MORNING HEADLINES DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX

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    According to the U.S. Department of Education, 54% of Americans ages 16 to 74 now rank below a sixth grade reading level. The youngest generations are showing further declines, and numeracy scores are similarly dismal. If America continues at this pace, and power is your only goal, solidifying your base among the poorly educated might actually make a lot of sense — consequences be damned.

    Certainly, the practiced con man and former President Donald Trump knew exactly who he was targeting. He didn’t even try to hide it, at one point outright exclaiming, “I love the poorly educated.” Scholars also noted he consistently spoke below a sixth grade level — a sharp contrast to his predecessor and the lowest of all presidents to date.

    Whether intentional or not, studies show that lower-educated people are more susceptible to conspiracy theories, and they also score consistently lower on critical thinking tests. This makes presenting basic facts and concepts such as COVID-19 or climate change inherently more difficult (ahem, Democrats) and opens the door for a simpler, more appealing message. For example, if people don’t want to wear a mask to begin with — and most don’t — rather than explain viral transmission, you can simply convince people it’s a hoax, giving them a reason not to do the thing they didn’t want to do in the first place.

    Is it any wonder, then, that conspiracy theories and the unqualified elected officials who push them — such as Colorado’s high school dropout Rep. Lauren Boebert — are on the rise? Coupled with the years-long Republican attacks on the Department of Education and the free press, one has to question if an uneducated population is exactly what the GOP is striving for."

    ReplyDelete
  11. Bobby: Stay where you are, I have called 911. When the truck arrives, have your pill bottles ready. The crew will need to make a list. Go ahead and tell them that you have a bone to pick publicly with an award winning author of a book you’ve been reading on and off for thirteen years. About how you don’t understand Einstein, that he hasn’t explained himself well enough, and that his long since dead teenage niece has your back on this one. They will make a phone call or two. Go ahead and get in the truck. Don’t make a fuss: they are young and lift weights at the fire house. Take some time off from the blog. The bitches that are always harping at you will find some other right wing concern troll to go after. It will work out. And if it doesn’t, could it be much worse than this? Get well.

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    Do you need a solution to cure your Herpes Disease contact Chief Dr Lucky to help and he will surely help you to cure your Herpes Virus .. I have suffered from Herpes-2 Virus for 4years ago that almost took my life. But one day I was searching the internet and I found Chief Dr Lucky saw so many testimonies on how Chief Dr Lucky helps people in curing their deadly diseases, and I contacted Chief Dr Lucky, asked him for solutions and he started the remedies for my health. He prepared herbal medicine for me and I received the herbal medicine and after using it for 2 weeks my condition has greatly improved, all my symptoms including Abdominal pain, Nausea and vomiting, Loss of appetite stopped, so I went to my doc and was confirmed negative. I am Herpes Virus free! contact the herbal doctor via his email> chiefdrlucky@gmail.com also visit his fb page> http://facebook.com/chiefdrlucky Website> Https://chiefdrluckyherbaltherapy.wordpress.com/ or his cell number / WhatsApp> +2348132777335

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