BREAKING: Charles Blow explains what racism is!

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018

No bait left behind:
In this morning New York Times, Charles Blow takes a brave, lonely stand.

His headline says, "Trump Is a Racist. Period." Within the column, his declaration to that effect goes like this:
BLOW: Trump is a racist. We can put that baby to bed.

“Racism” and “racist” are simply words that have definitions, and Trump comfortably and unambiguously meets those definitions.
In his next sentence, Blow says "racism" is a word with a "simple definition." At the very start of his column, he defines the term as shown below, hard-copy headline included:
BLOW (1/15/18): Trump Is a Racist. Period.

I find nothing more useless than debating the existence of racism, particularly when you are surrounded by evidence of its existence. It feels to me like a way to keep you fighting against the water until you drown.

The debates themselves, I believe, render a simple concept impossibly complex, making the very meaning of “racism” frustratingly murky.

So, let’s strip that away here. Let’s be honest and forthright.

Racism is simply the belief that race is an inherent and determining factor in a person’s or a people’s character and capabilities, rendering some inferior and others superior. These beliefs are racial prejudices.
In that highlighted statement, Blow defines the term "racism." We're inclined to disagree with his "simple definition," and with his basic instincts regarding such matters as this.

Is racism really a simple concept? It all depends on what the meaning of "simple concept" is!

That said, we think the definition requires two parts, and that Blow has fudged the first. After consulting with experts and Hollywood stars, we would expand Blow's definition as shown below:
Racism is the mistaken belief that people belong to different "races" and that membership in some "race" is an inherent and determining factor in a person’s or a people’s character and capabilities, rendering some inferior and others superior.
Having defined the term that way, we'll perform an additional service. We'll advise you to be careful in applying the term to various people you loathe.

In the current instance, is Donald J. Trump a racist? We'd recommend a more constructive term, a term Bob Dylan coined. Beyond that, we'll recommend pity over loathing, even as a political strategy:
I pity the poor immigrant
Who wishes he would’ve stayed home
Who uses all his power to do evil
But in the end is always left so alone

That man whom with his fingers cheats
Who lies with every breath
Who passionately hates his life
And likewise fears his death

I pity the poor immigrant
Whose strength is spent in vain
Whose heaven is like Ironsides
Whose tears are like rain
Who eats but is not satisfied
Who hears but does not see
Who falls in love with wealth itself
And turns his back on me.
We'd recommend pity over loathing. We'd further suggest that you try viewing Trump as a "poor immigrant," in Dylan's sense.

Even here, we'd recommend that you be careful in the accusations you make involving terms like "evil" and "lies," unless you secretly long for war and all the destruction it brings.

Is Donald J. Trump best seen as a "racist?" Is he possibly better seen as a "poor immigrant," in Dylan's sense of the term, in which he "eats but is not satisfied" and turns his back on thee?

We recommend pity over loathing as the sounder moral stance. But also, as the stance which is more likely to change the world.

Dr. King wrote and spoke, again and again, about "the love ethic of Jesus." Dylan offered a deeper insight into people who speak and behave in the manner of Donald J. Trump.

In his Second Inaugural, Abraham Lincoln basically said, Our side did this too. These are the people the world admires. By way of contrast, fiery people who "leave no bait behind" tend to produce more war.

Last Thursday night, cable was full of brave people who dared stoke the call for endless cultural war. In this morning's Washington Post, Margaret Sullivan hails their wisdom and courage:
SULLIVAN (1/15/18): Lisa Mascaro of the Los Angeles Times provided meaningful context in her immediate news story: “While cruder and blunter than his past public statements, the president’s comments were in keeping with his long-standing position that the United States should shift its immigration policy away from poorer, developing countries, and instead focus on carefully selecting educated immigrants, especially from Europe.”

[...]

By evening, some cable newscasters had become far more blunt. Don Lemon of CNN flatly declared: “The president of the United States is racist.” His colleague Anderson Cooper went there, too: Trump’s words were not just “racially charged” but simply racist.

David Leonhardt of the New York Times quickly wrote a ­well-argued opinion piece, “Just Say It: Trump Is a Racist.”
Everyone was bravely willing to say it! We would have been inclined to say something different. Of course, we also wouldn't have played the role of Trump's pool boy all through Campaign 2016, as the newly brave and forthright Cooper horrifically did.

That said, our flailing species is heavily wired for war. We're heavily wired to see the world as Us and Them. Perhaps because of that elemental wiring, Blow accompanies his column today with a graphic headlined like this:
'Deplorable' Sounds About Right
So cool! Our species is wired to spot The Others and to call them names. In such ways, we strongly tend to "study war much more."

In closing, let's return to our clarified, two-part definition of "racism." We'll close by asking a question:

Do you believe that our floundering species is divided into "races?" We modern progressives have purchased that concept in much the way the townfolk of River City rushed to purchase all those phony trombones.

Do you believe that so-called blacks and so-called whites really belong to different "races?" That destructive belief is a major part of "the world the slaveholders made." No one pushes that destructive idea more than our tribe currently does.

Our tribe is deeply invested in that idea, and is strongly inclined to feel no pity for people like Donald J. Trump. Does that latter fact mean that we secretly long to be like him? Anthropologists have told us it does!

Blow says the R-word has a simple definition. We'd call that a simple-minded idea, but our species is wired for that!

12 comments:

  1. I don't think "racism" means anything at all these days.

    It's just one of several words lib-zombies like to use when referring to their opponents. They fancy that it makes them, lib-zombies, superior to the rest of us. But of course everyone understands that it's just a consequence of their lib-zombie brains having decayed beyond recognition...

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    1. Everyone in St. Petersburg understands 'Mao'

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  2. The word "racist" is conducive of bad thinking, because it can embody so many different behaviors. Here's partial list
    A racist is someone who
    1. Lynches black people
    2. Commits violence against blacks, simply because of their race
    3. Refuses to hire blacks or discriminates against blacks in hiring
    4. Refuses to allow blacks equal accommodations on busses, lunch counters, hotels.
    5. Used the N-word
    6. Uses non-PC speech
    7. Doesn’t demand that Confederate statues be taken down
    8. Opposes some legislation designed to provide extra protection or support to blacks
    9. Has an inherent feeling that races differ on average in some respects


    (1) through (4) are much more serious than (5) through (9). Using the same word for all of these behaviors is designed to trick people, by associating the less serious with more serious.

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    1. As Bob Dylan would put it, "Something is happening but you don't know what it is, do you Mr Sommersby?"

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    2. Good job, David in Ca. I agree with Blow that when it is used correctly (as it is so infrequently), "racist" is someone who believes a racial group is inherently inferior.

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  3. This makes me look forward to voting for Trump again, and happy he's being helped by his opponents in the same way he was when he won the election.

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    1. Liberal's hapless playing of the race card is an enormous gift to Trump.

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  4. The most significant achievement of progressives in the last year is getting Trump elected. The second most significant and most tragic is getting thousands more black men murdered in big cities because innocent cops aren't protecting them for fear of MSNBC ruining their careers and bringing harm to their families. One consolation for progressives is that several innocent cops were slaughtered as a direct result of their activism, but overall fewer cops have been killed on the job while thousands more black men have been murdered for lack of aggressive enough policing.

    Those black men are martyrs for a very good cause though. It feels so good to call people racist especially when you're white.

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  5. Dylan is using the word immigrant in an odd way.

    Racism is not defined by social psychologists as blow or Somerby have stated. They include animus toward those designated as belonging to another race as part of their definition. That animus motivates discrimination which is the practice of treating others differently, especially badly, because of their race.

    Trump did that when he ignored Puerto Rico's needs in the aftermath of the hurricane. He is doing it when he treats the Dreamers badly. He has done it to staff at his businesses and to reporters who are members of another race.

    Somerby's injunction that we love one another is fine when dealing with people who merely have odd views about superiority based on race. It is not fine when you have people actively harming others because of their race. Then loving others is an inappropriate solution to the harm being done to some people based on race.

    Somerby needs to face up to this. Trump is not mistaken. He is a wrongdoer. There is a big difference here.

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  6. Whiff!!
    You're missing the story, Ace.
    They're all okay with it.
    No more plausible deniability about the GOP being an amoral dumpster fire. The media's equivocation on that fact is something a media criticism blog might want to address.

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  7. Bob has given this talk, always with the dubious illusions to the great and mysterious "John Westly Harding" record, many times before. We can be thankful that on this King day he left out a standard feature: his insistance that we apply Dr. King's standard of obvious racism before we call it out. Because, as we were to see, when such instances would present themselves, Bob would then insist that we simply laugh them off.
    Bob might have pointed out that in this "shithole" instence liberals are behaving couterproductively, that at this point Trump has shown his hatred of black people so often and so nakedly that flying off the handle and trying to shame the broken people who support him is not much going to get anywhere. There are indeed many here among us who feel that life is but a joke. It is the core element of the Trump supporters poliitcs of sadism. Bob should wake up, it's getting late.

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  8. In another post, you've persuasively argued that journalists should not speculate idly about Donald Trump's mental fitness. They are not experts and should seek instead to gain insight from mental health professionals.

    In this post, however, you speculate about race, suggesting there is no such thing as a distinction between "black" and "white." However valid that belief, it is one better expressed by experts in the area.

    Blow's definition- less broad, more exact, and giving proper respect to whether the bias is inherent- is excellent. It is, further, consistent with your own distaste for overly broad classification. classification-

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